These Honour short films were selected for the Honour Film Screening because of their excellence in story-telling, production and in amplifying the value of honour.

My Father, the Karang Guni

A young boy struggles with the stigma of having a father who is a karang guni (rag and bone man).

“Growing up, I was very conscious that my father’s occupation was unlike those of my friends’ fathers. Looking back now, I feel ashamed that I was ashamed of my father. He braved the sun and rain, and other people’s contempt, just to raise our family.”

– Jackson Ho, director

Credits

Director: Jackson Ho
Producer: Chenise Tan
Assistant Director: Kelvin Ooi
Editor: Sean Tan
Camera: Muhammad Farihin
Production Design: Syahir Rathi
Sound: Zuhra Adilah

 

An Elephant Ate a Goldfish 

A young adult struggles with the demands of being a preschool teacher and her relationship with her father.

“This film is inspired by my mother who is a childcare teacher. Everyday I see her coming back from work really tired, but she never complains. I really wanted to make this film to appreciate her.”

– Kathleen Bu, director

Credits

Director: Kathleen Bu
Producer: Fiona Ng Shu Qi
Director of Photography: Perrin Tan
Editor & Assistant Director: Nicholas Teo
Art Director: Angel Kwong & Clarissa
Sound: Glenn Soh

Featuring music by: Glenn Soh & Kathleen Bu

The Chair

Realising that his mother stands on her feet all day along, a young boy tries to secure a chair for her to rest on.

“This film is a tribute to my mum, who runs a provision shop. She stands all day, and doesn’t get to sit down at all. The man who plays the uncle from the neighbouring shop is my father. So this is a family effort from my dad and I, to honour my mother together.”

– D Naveen Raj, director

Credits

Director: D Naveen Raj
Producers:
D Naveen Raj
Devamanikandan Kannaya Somu

Tagalabas (Outsider)

A young boy struggles with his dual identity — born a Filipino, but living and studying in Singapore.

“This film is inspired by the experiences of my brother and I. We had to ask ourselves, ‘Where do I feel I belong?’ Honour means to pay tribute to, and to shed a light on, something that needs to be seen and heard. I hope that’s what I’ve done with this film.”

– Abegail Loreno Arendayen, director

Credits

Director: Abegail Loreno Arendayen 
Producer: Whitney Poon

Strike

Struck by a rare eye condition, a man struggles to make sense of his predicament, and to triumph over it.

“Being able to see and then gradually losing your eyesight is a scary thing. We wanted to show Mr Robert Ong’s journey and how strong he is as a person. His story has many values that we could learn from.”

– Joshua Poh, director

Credits

Director: Joshua Poh Wei Da
Producer: Tan Li Jin
Editor: Chan Wei Hung Marvin
Assistant Director: Ranjeetha D/O Saragabani
Camera Operator: Tan Qing Jun
Production Designer: Ramya Sivakumar
Sound Recordist: Alvin Jai Alias

Katherine’s Melody

After a 7-year battle with cancer, a hospice patient fills her remaining days with music and hope, treasuring each and every day of her life.

“Katherine’s last wish was to share her story with others, and I am glad we were able to do this for her. I was struck by Katherine’s will to live. She honoured life — every day she had, and the people around her. From her, I’ve learnt to honour life.”

– Brenda Er, director/producer

Credits

Director / Producer: Brenda Er
Cinematography: Jasmine Teh & Taylor Lau

AUDIENCE REACTIONS

Guests at Season 8 of the Honour Film Screening tell us why the experience was so special for them.
“Fantastic screening! Great work from all the students and thank you Honour Singapore for having such a great platform for filmmaking. I teared in almost all 6 films! Thank you!”

– Kenji Ong 

“The films have captured the essence of honour and honouring in touching and relatable ways. A shout out to the film makers! Well done!”

– Kevin Patt, Canberra Primary School 

“All the films were well made, and each film had its own representation of ‘Honour’. I’ve learned a lot from these short films.”

– Dawn Yap, School of the Arts

“I really enjoyed this screening. The films were all really beautiful and meaningful. It really touched my heart and made me feel the importance of honouring the people in my life.”

– Lee Si Min

“This is my 4th year attending. You have done it again. All 6 films bring tears of joy and excitement. My knowledge of honour has grown to another level. Thank you. I thoroughly enjoyed myself.”

– Anonymous (via feedback form) 

“All films were done with love, care and sensitivity to reflect the true meaning of honour. Thank you for initiating this opportunity for film makers to depict the different life stories.”

– Anonymous (via feedback form)

FILMMAKERS’ REACTIONS

Some of the featured filmmakers of Season 8 tell us why the Honour Film Screening was unforgettable for them.
“When I was growing up, I was always conscious of my father’s occupation and how it was looked down upon by others. Later, as I grew older, I was ashamed that I had been ashamed of my father. After all, his hard work had raised me, and it raised a family. My film is a reflection of that experience.
So bringing my dad to the Honour Film Screening and seeing the audience applauding him was really unforgettable. I am happy that I could do a little something for my father, to show him the appreciation he deserves. It really made me feel that all my hard work was worth it.
Later, when my film was chosen for online release on Father’s Day, there were many comments from the public, expressing support and admiration for my father. My father was very surprised as he did not expect such a reaction, and was very heartened by the support.
It was a privilege to have Honour Singapore screen and showcase my film to the public. An opportunity like this does not come by every day, and I am very grateful to have their help in creating something I am proud of.”

– Jackson Ho, director, “My Father, the Karang Guni”

“Season 7 of the Honour Film Screening was extremely important to me as I made my film hoping to show my family that amends can be made for estranged relationships; that if we just try to understand each other, we may be able to find a way to love. And in a small way, it has changed my family’s thinking.
This is not something that comes by often. For me, having our film screened to the public is an assurance that our film may have touched people’s hearts or changed their minds about something they were struggling with.
And that’s why I always look forward to the next Honour Film Screening, hoping that another life will be changed by these films.”

– Kathleen Bu, director, “An Elephant Ate a Goldfish”

Not just the destination, but the journey

While the films are noteworthy in and of themselves, the process behind the making of each film is equally significant and important. To make their films, the filmmakers reflected on and delved deeply into the meaning of honour – what it means for themselves and others.

In featuring the real-life subjects or inspiration behind the films, we are also honouring them and their stories. That is what makes the Honour films meaningful for everyone: our filmmakers, their subjects, and our audience.

Watch the video to hear what the filmmakers have learned in the process of making an Honour film!

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